Title

Guantanamo Detainees after Boumediene: Now What?

Tuesday, July 15, 2008
2:30pm
2200 Rayburn House Office Building
Washington, DC 20515
United States
Official Transcript: 
Members: 
Name: 
Hon. Alcee Hastings
Title Text: 
Chairman
Body: 
Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe
Name: 
Hon. Ben Cardin
Title Text: 
Co-Chairman
Body: 
Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe
Witnesses: 
Name: 
Mr. Matthew C. Maxman
Title: 
Associate Professor of Law
Body: 
Columbia Law School
Name: 
Mr. Gabor Rona
Title: 
International Legal Director
Body: 
Human Rights First
Name: 
Mr. Jeremy Shapiro
Title: 
Research Director of the Center on the United States and Europe
Body: 
Brookings Institution

The hearing reviewed the detainee-related policy issues – particularly for Guantanamo detainees -- that remain in the aftermath of the Supreme Court’s recent decision in Boumediene. Witnesses also had the opportunity to discuss a related question: what does Europe do with its terror suspects, and are there any lessons for the United States from the European experience?

The Supreme Court ruled in a 5-4 decision in Boumediene v. Bush that foreign terrorism suspects held at the Guantanamo Bay detention facility have the right under the Constitution to challenge their detention in a U.S. civilian court.

Relevant countries: 
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