Title

Is It Torture Yet?

Monday, December 10, 2007
United States
Official Transcript: 
Members: 
Name: 
Hon. Alcee L. Hastings
Title Text: 
Chairman
Body: 
Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe
Name: 
Hon. Benjamin Cardin
Title Text: 
Co-Chairman
Body: 
Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe
Witnesses: 
Name: 
Devon Chaffee
Title: 
Associate Attorney
Body: 
Human Rights First
Name: 
Thomas C. Hilde
Title: 
Research Professor
Body: 
School of Public Policy, University of Maryland
Name: 
Dr. Christian Davenport
Title: 
Professor of Political Science
Body: 
University of Maryland
Name: 
Mr. Malcolm Nance
Title: 
Director
Body: 
Special Readiness Services International

Chairman Hastings and Co-Chairman Cardin discussed with others the issues of torture and banned treatment. This hearing examined whether or not the interrogation techniques of suspected terrorists by the U.S. government qualified as torture.  Co-Chairman Cardin argued that while the Helsinki Commission challenges what other countries do, it is also in the Commission’s right to make sure the U.S. is living up to its commitments in the Helsinki Final Act.

Relevant issues: 
Relevant countries: 
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