Title

Guantanamo: Implications for U.S. Human Rights Leadership

Thursday, June 21, 2007
2325 Rayburn House Office Building
Washington, DC 20515
United States
Official Transcript: 
Members: 
Name: 
Hon. Alcee Hastings
Title Text: 
Chairman
Body: 
Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe
Name: 
Hon. Ben Cardin
Title Text: 
Co-Chairman
Body: 
Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe
Name: 
Hon. Steny Hoyer
Title Text: 
Majority Leader
Body: 
U.S. House of Representatives
Witnesses: 
Name: 
John B. Bellinger III
Title: 
Legal Adviser
Body: 
Department of State
Name: 
Anne-Marie Lizin
Title: 
President of the Belgian Senate and the OSCE Parliamentary Assembly
Body: 
Special Representative on Guantanamo
Name: 
Tom Malinowski
Title: 
Advocacy Director
Body: 
Human Rights Watch
Name: 
Gabor Rona
Title: 
International Legal Director
Body: 
Human Rights First

The hearing is entitled “Guantanamo: Implications for U.S. Human Rights Leadership” will focus on the international perspective of Guantanamo, particularly in the 56 participating States of the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE) and implications for U.S. leadership on human rights issues.

 The detention facility at the U.S. Naval Bases at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, was opened in January 2002 and, it currently holds around 385 detainees. The facility has come under fire from human rights organizations and others for the alleged mistreatment of detainees and the legal framework according to which they have been held.

Relevant countries: 
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