Title

Helsinki Commission to Hold Hearing on Latest Developments in Uzbekistan Crisis

Thursday, June 23, 2005

WASHINGTON – Senator Sam Brownback (R-KS), Chairman of the United States Helsinki Commission, announced that the Commission will hold a hearing to discuss the ongoing crisis in Uzbekistan and its implications for the United States.

THE UZBEKISTAN CRISIS:  ASSESSING THE IMPACT AND NEXT STEPS

2:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.

Wednesday, June 29, 2005

124 Dirksen Senate Office Building

 

The featured panelists will be:

Panel I

Mira Ricardel, Acting Assistant Secretary of Defense for International Security Policy, Department of Defense

Panel II

Muhammad Salih, Chairman, Erk Party

Holly Cartner, Executive Director, Europe & Central Asia Division, Human Rights Watch

Robert Templer, Director, Asia Program, International Crisis Group

Galima Bukharbaeva, Correspondent, Institute for War and Peace Reporting

Media contact: 
Email: 
csce[dot]press[at]mail[dot]house[dot]gov
Phone: 
202.225.1901
Relevant countries: 
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