Title

Europe's Refugee Crisis: How Should the US, EU and OSCE Respond?

Tuesday, October 20, 2015
2:00pm
Rayburn House Office Building, Room 2200
Washington, DC
United States
Members: 
Name: 
Hon. Christopher Smith
Title Text: 
Chairman
Body: 
Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe
Name: 
Hon. Benjamin Cardin
Title Text: 
Commissioner
Body: 
Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe
Name: 
Hon. Joseph Pitts
Title Text: 
Commissioner
Body: 
Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe
Name: 
Hon. Michael Burgess
Title Text: 
Commissioner
Body: 
Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe
Name: 
Hon. Jeanne Shaheen
Title Text: 
Commissioner
Body: 
Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe
Name: 
Hon. John Boozman
Title Text: 
Commissioner
Body: 
Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe
Name: 
Hon. Randy Hultgren
Title Text: 
Commissioner
Body: 
Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe
Name: 
Hon. Steve Cohen
Title Text: 
Commissioner
Body: 
Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe
Witnesses: 
Name: 
Anne Richard
Title: 
Assistant Secretary of State for Population, Refugees, and Migration
Body: 
Department of State
Name: 
Djerdj Matkovic
Title: 
Ambassador to the United States
Body: 
Republic of Serbia
Name: 
David O'Sullivan
Title: 
Ambassador to the United States
Body: 
The European Union Delegation
Name: 
Sean Callahan
Title: 
Chief Operating Officer
Body: 
Catholic Relief Services
Name: 
Shelly Pitterman
Title: 
Regional Representative
Body: 
United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees
Name: 
Metodija Koloski
Title: 
Co-Founder and President
Body: 
United Macedonian Diaspora and Gavin Kopel

This hearing, held on October 20, 2015, discussed possible responses to the Syrian refugee crisis.  Witnesses, including representatives from the American and Serbian governments, the UNHCR, the European Union, and non-profit groups working with refugees, highlighted the scale and intensity of the crisis.  Many of the witnesses also emphasized the need for cooperation among governments and between governments and non-profit organizations in addressing this crisis.

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