Title

Helsinki Commission Briefing to Launch Staff Report on Corruption in Ukraine

Tuesday, November 21, 2017

WASHINGTON—The Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe, also known as the Helsinki Commission, today announced the following briefing:

UKRAINE’S FIGHT AGAINST CORRUPTION

Wednesday, November 29, 2017
1:00PM
Dirksen Senate Office Building
Room 562

Live Webcast: www.facebook.com/HelsinkiCommission

Today, Ukraine has an historic opportunity to overcome its long struggle with pervasive corruption. Never before in its past has the country experienced such meaningful reforms, with the most significant being the establishment of a robust and independent anticorruption architecture. However, much remains to be done. An anticorruption court is urgently needed, as is an end to the escalating harassment of civil society.

This briefing of the U.S. Helsinki Commission will introduce the Commission’s recently published report, “The Internal Enemy: A Helsinki Commission Staff Report on Corruption in Ukraine.” Briefers will discuss the conclusions of this report as well as the fight against corruption in Ukraine more broadly. Copies of the report will be available for distribution.

The following panelists will offer brief remarks, followed by questions:

  • Oksana Shulyar, Deputy Chief of Mission, Embassy of Ukraine in the United States
  • Orest Deychakiwsky, Former U.S. Helsinki Commission Policy Advisor for Ukraine
  • Anders Aslund, Senior Fellow, Atlantic Council
  • Brian Dooley, Senior Advisor, Human Rights First
Media contact: 
Name: 
Stacy Hope
Email: 
csce[dot]press[at]mail[dot]house[dot]gov
Phone: 
202.225.1901
Relevant issues: 
Relevant countries: 
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