Title

Hastings and Cardin to Hold Hearing on Energy Security and Democracy

Tuesday, July 17, 2007

WASHINGTON - Congressman Alcee L. Hastings (D-FL), Chairman of the Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe (U.S. Helsinki Commission) and Co-Chairman Senator Benjamin L. Cardin (D-MD), will hold a hearing on Monday, July 23, 2007, at 3:00 p.m. in room 419 of the Dirksen Senate Office Building. The hearing, entitled “Energy and Democracy: Oil and Water?”, will examine the question of whether the development of democracy is incompatible with the development of a country’s energy resources. For many countries energy resources can be a blessing as they provide much needed income; however, they can also be a curse that leads to stunted economic and political development. Witnesses at the hearing will discuss international efforts to combat this “resource curse” through programs that seek to instill transparency and accountability such as “Publish What You Pay” and the “Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative.” The hearing will focus specifically on the energy-rich countries that are members of the Organization of Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE), including Russia, Kazakhstan, Azerbaijan and Turkmenistan.

In addition, witnesses are expected to discuss how energy kleptocracy impacts U.S. energy security. Six of the top ten oil-exporting countries to the United States are ranked by Transparency International as some of the world’s most corrupt countries. Corruption and kleptocracy often lead to political instability and subsequently higher oil prices, which have the potential to impact the economic and national security interests of the United States.

Witnesses invited to testify include:

Mr. Simon Taylor, Director, Global Witness

Mr. Roman Kupchinsky, Regional Analyst at Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty

Media contact: 
Email: 
csce[dot]press[at]mail[dot]house[dot]gov
Phone: 
202.225.1901
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