Title

The Yugoslavia Conflict: Potential for Spillover in the Balkans

Wednesday, July 21, 1993
2:00pm
628 Dirksen Senate Office Building
Washington, DC
United States
Members: 
Name: 
Hon. Dennis DeConcini
Title Text: 
Chairman
Body: 
Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe
Name: 
Hon. Steny Hoyer
Title Text: 
Co-Chairman
Body: 
Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe
Witnesses: 
Name: 
Stephen Oxman
Title: 
Assistant Secretary for European and Canadian Affairs
Body: 
Department of State
Name: 
Paul Warnke
Title: 
Former Assistant Secretary for International Affiars
Body: 
Department of Defense
Name: 
Dr. John Lampe
Title: 
Director, East European Studies
Body: 
Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars
Name: 
Janusz Bugajski
Title: 
Associate Director of East European Studies
Body: 
Center for Strategic and International Studies

This hearing reviewed the potential for spillover in the Yugoslav conflict. In particular, the hearing examined the aggression in Bosnia- Herzegovina and the possible effects of this on its own ethnic communities and on those of neighboring countries. The economic decline that followed the disintegration of Yugoslavia provided additional hardships for the large refugee population in the region. The Commissioners examined how the U.S. should respond, and whether current policies, such as sanctions on Serbia and Montenegro, are effective.

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