Title

Genocide in Bosnia

Tuesday, April 04, 1995
2:00pm
2322 Rayburn House Office Building
Washington, D.C., 20024
United States
Members: 
Name: 
Hon. Christopher Smith
Title Text: 
Chairman
Body: 
Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe
Name: 
Hon. Alfonse Amato
Title Text: 
Co-Chairman
Body: 
Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe
Name: 
Hon. Frank Wolf
Title Text: 
Commissioner
Body: 
Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe
Name: 
Hon. Steny H. Hoyer
Title Text: 
Commissioner
Body: 
Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe
Name: 
Hon. Benjamin Cardin
Title Text: 
Commissioner
Body: 
Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe
Name: 
Hon. James Moran
Title Text: 
Member of Congress
Body: 
House of Representatives
Name: 
Hon. Frank R. Lautenberg
Title Text: 
Senator
Body: 
Senate
Witnesses: 
Name: 
Professor Cherif Bassiouni
Title: 
Proffessor of Law at DePaul University
Body: 
President of International human Rights Law Institute
Name: 
Andras Riedlmayer
Title: 
Bibliographer
Body: 
Harvard University
Name: 
Roy Gutman
Title: 
Journalist/Pulitzer Prize Winner
Body: 
Newsday
Name: 
David Rieff
Title: 
Author

This hearing focused on determinig if the recent ethnic cleansing, the destruction of cultural sites, and war crimes and crimes against humanity in Bosnia and the former Yugoslavia constituted genocide.  In particular, the witnesses and Commissioners discussed  how many of the war crimes were committed on orders from the military and the political leadership.

Relevant countries: 
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