Title

A Child’s Life in Sarajevo

Thursday, March 10, 1994
562 Dirksen Senate Office Building
Washington, DC 20002
United States
Official Transcript: 
Members: 
Name: 
Hon. Dennis DeConcini
Title Text: 
Chairman
Body: 
Committee on Security and Cooperation in Europe
Name: 
Hon. Steny Hoyer
Title Text: 
Co-Chairman
Body: 
Committee on Security and Cooperation in Europe
Name: 
Hon. Edward Markey
Title Text: 
Commissioner
Body: 
Committee on Security and Cooperation in Europe
Name: 
Hon. Christopher Smith
Title Text: 
Commissioner
Body: 
Committee on Security and Cooperation in Europe
Witnesses: 
Name: 
Zlata Filipovic
Title: 
Author
Body: 
“Zlata’s Diary: A Child’s Life in Sarajevo”

This hearing examined the warfare, aggression, and genocide in Sarajevo through the eyes of 13-year-old, Zlata Filipovic, whose diary of the war period was published in the United States. The causes of the war, as well as the shortcomings of the international response, were addressed.

In her testimony, Zlata Filipovic spoke in the name of children from Sarajevo who suffered through war time atrocities. The realities of war were presented, as well as an interpretation of the causes of the war from someone who had experienced it. The goal of this hearing was to encourage the administration to continue to improve recent efforts in the region.

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