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Batyr Berdiev: Poems from Prison
Thursday, September 21, 2017

And when we leave our house, where all is so familiar –
The flower vase and the worn out carpet –
The shadow of our quiet hope will stay at home,
Reflected in the eyes of those who remember us.
And life will continue, as our life was once lived,
And, of course, other songs will be sung,
But human hearts, like soldiers of hope
Will again and again both suffer and dream.

                                                            —Batyr Berdiev

On September 15, the NGO campaign “Prove They Are Alive!” published a book of poems written by Turkmenistan’s former Foreign Minister and former Ambassador to the OSCE Batyr Berdiev, one of more than a hundred people who have disappeared in Turkmenistan’s prisons.

The poems appear to have been written between December 2002 and March 2003 and were smuggled out of prison, most likely in 2003. Most are dedicated to Berdiev’s wife and son; they speak of his love for them, of freedom, and of their life while he was serving as Ambassador to the OSCE in Vienna. The book was unveiled at a side event at the 2017 OSCE Human Dimension Implementation Meeting (HDIM) in Warsaw, Poland, with the participation of Helsinki Commission staff.

Berdiev was arrested in December 2002 in connection with an alleged coup attempt against then-President Niyazov in November 2002. His “confession” was broadcast on Turkmen television later that month, and he was convicted in January 2003 in a closed trial and sentenced to 25 years imprisonment.

There are credible reports that he was tortured following his arrest. His relatives have had no information about his fate or whereabouts since, although there have been several conflicting reports of his death in Turkmenistan’s notoriously inhumane high-security Ovadan Depe prison.  The Helsinki Commission has continued to raise his case – along with others who have disappeared in Turkmenistan’s prisons – over the fifteen years since Berdiev’s arrest, in meetings with Turkmen officials, letters, and public briefings.

The “Prove They Are Alive” campaign has also published an updated list of persons who have disappeared in Turkmenistan’s prisons, which has now grown to 112. Some of the new additions include persons who were arrested only this year. Following the arrests of Berdiev and hundreds of others in the wake of the alleged 2002 coup attempt, the United States and nine other countries invoked the OSCE Moscow Mechanism, which triggered an international investigation and report on the situation and treatment of those accused of being involved. Every year at the OSCE Human Dimension Implementation Meeting, the United States makes a special statement urging the government of Turkmenistan to provide information on and access to those who have disappeared in the country’s prison.

Read the book of poems by Batyr Berdiev.

Parting Song

To Bakharochka and Rakhmasha
My Beloved and Dear Ones

It happened like this; this is how it was written in the stars –

Along the winter road, through the haze of dawn,

Tearing me away from you, life chases me to this:

A prison transfer into the unknown, delirious from cholera.

And a cry of anguish froze on my lips,

And my heart broke into a painful gallop.

If you can, forgive me for leaving you alone

In this world of enslaved backs and minds,

Forgive me that this was how things were, and that fate broke

Our life in half, to the noise of court fools howling,

But the heavenly judge has still not had his say

And no one knows which way our compass points.

And yet, I believe, one day through tears of prayer

Heaven will smile on us again, through our son’s eyes,

And hope will reveal us its secrets

And different voices will speak out.

One has to continue living, one has to endure

The pain of separation, the prison host,

And then I will return home,

Never to leave you again.

And when I return, we will summon our friends –

Those who didn’t betray us, or disappear, or perish –

And over a lavishly spread table we three will embrace

And remember this journey, remember these words…

                                                                —Batyr Berdiev

Poems translated from Russian by Catherine Fitzpatrick, James Womack, and the “Prove They Are Alive!” campaign team.

Photograph and poems courtesy of the “Prove They Are Alive!” Campaign.

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