Title

U.S. Helsinki Commission to Hold Hearing on Developments in the Western Balkans and Policy Responses

Wednesday, March 05, 2014

WASHINGTON–The Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe (U.S. Helsinki Commission) today announced the following hearing:

Developments in the Western Balkans and Policy Responses

Wednesday, March 5, 2014
10:00 am
Dirksen Senate Office Building
Room 106

Scheduled to testify:

  • Hoyt Yee, Deputy Assistant Secretary for European and Eurasian Affairs, U.S. Department of State
  • Tanja Fajon, Member (Slovenia), European Parliament
  • Kurt Volker, Executive Director, the McCain Institute for International Leadership

The countries of the Western Balkan region of Europe – Albania, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Croatia, Kosovo, Macedonia, Montenegro and Serbia – have started 2014 with a mix of challenges and expectations. Elections, dialogue and ongoing reform will be shaped by the hope of taking the next steps toward European and Euro-Atlantic integration, with each country at a different stage of achievement or preparedness but all of them sharing an interest in progress, advancement and stability across the entire region. The hearing will feature the official views and policy approaches of the United States toward the countries of the Western Balkans, supplemented by the insights and analysis of experts from both sides of the Atlantic.

Media contact: 
Email: 
csce[dot]press[at]mail[dot]house[dot]gov
Phone: 
202.225.1901
Leadership: 
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