Title

Refugee and Migrant Youth in Europe Focus of Upcoming Helsinki Commission Briefing

Tuesday, January 16, 2018

WASHINGTON—The Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe, also known as the Helsinki Commission, today announced the following briefing:

NEXT STEPS FOR REFUGEE AND MIGRANT YOUTH IN EUROPE

Tuesday, January 23, 2018
10:00 AM to 11:00 AM
Capitol Visitor Center
Room SVC 203

Live Webcast: www.facebook.com/HelsinkiCommission

As Europe continues to experience an influx of refugees and migrants, the numbers of youth (persons under the age of 18) have increased. This Helsinki Commission briefing will highlight the current situation of refugee and migrant youth in Europe with a focus on support, protection, and integration services being put in place for accompanied and unaccompanied arrivals. 

The briefing will include case studies from Greece, where there has been a recent surge in refugee and migrant arrivals, and where unaccompanied youth are estimated to account for approximately 15 percent of the total number of arrivals. 

The following panelists are scheduled to participate:

  • Sofia Kouvelaki, Executive Director, The HOME Project, Athens, Greece
  • Kathleen Newland, Senior Fellow and Co-Founder, Migration Policy Institute, Washington, DC
Media contact: 
Name: 
Stacy Hope
Email: 
csce[dot]press[at]mail[dot]house[dot]gov
Phone: 
202.225.1901
Relevant countries: 
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