Title

Helsinki Commission to Review Role of Professional Exchanges in Strengthening Democratic Institutions

Monday, December 02, 2019

WASHINGTON—The Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe, also known as the Helsinki Commission, today announced the following hearing:

PUBLIC DIPLOMACY, DEMOCRACY, AND GLOBAL LEADERSHIP
An Approach for the 21st Century

Thursday, December 5, 2019
10:00 a.m.
Longworth House Office Building
Room 1334

Live Webcast: www.youtube.com/HelsinkiCommission

For more than a century, the United States has advanced human rights, economic, and security policy goals in Europe by cultivating people-to-people ties across the Atlantic. More than 500 heads of state, 100 Members of Congress, and thousands of professionals have participated in U.S. Government-sponsored exchanges, including the State Department’s International Visitor Leadership Program, while public and private organizations have hosted similar programs to bring leaders together.   

Witnesses at the hearing will explore the origins and role of professional exchanges and other public diplomacy programs that strengthen relationships with U.S. allies in the face of shared challenges including eroding trust in democratic institutions, demographic shifts, technological advancements, and evolving security threats. In particular, the hearing will focus on international exchange initiatives that strengthen democratic institutions by targeting young and diverse leaders, encouraging civic engagement, and fostering social inclusion and cohesion in the OSCE region. 

The following witnesses are scheduled to participate:

  • Lora Berg, Senior Fellow, Leadership Programs, German Marshall Fund of the United States
  • Cordell Carter, II, Executive Director, Socrates Program, The Aspen Institute  
  • Stacie Walters Fujii, Chair, American Council of Young Political Leaders (ACYPL)  
Photo credit: German Marshall Fund of the United States
Media contact: 
Name: 
Stacy Hope
Email: 
csce[dot]press[at]mail[dot]house[dot]gov
Phone: 
202.225.1901
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