Title

Uzbekistan: Stifled Democracy, Human Rights in Decline

Thursday, June 24, 2004
11:30am
2203 Rayburn House Office Building
Washington, DC
United States
Members: 
Name: 
Hon. Christopher Smith
Title Text: 
Chairman
Body: 
Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe
Statement: 
Name: 
Hon. Benjamin Cardin
Title Text: 
Ranking Member
Body: 
Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe
Name: 
Hon. Joseph Pitts
Title Text: 
Commissioner
Body: 
Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe
Name: 
Hon Mike Mcintyre
Title Text: 
Commissioner
Body: 
Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe
Witnesses: 
Name: 
Lorne W. Craner
Title: 
Assistant Secretary for Democracy, Human Rights and Labor
Body: 
Department of State
Statement: 
Name: 
Hon. Lynn Pascoe
Title: 
Deputy Assistant Secretary for European and Eurasian Affairs
Body: 
Department of State
Statement: 
Name: 
His Excellency Abdulaziz Komilov
Title: 
Ambassador to the United States
Body: 
Republic of Kazakhstan
Statement: 
Name: 
Martha Olcott
Title: 
Senior Associate
Body: 
Carnegie Endowment for International Peace
Statement: 
Name: 
Abdurahim Polat
Title: 
Chairman
Body: 
Birlik Party and Representative Human Rights Watch
Statement: 
Name: 
Veronika Leila Szente Goldston
Title: 
Advocacy Director for Europe and Central Asia
Body: 
Human Rights Watch
Statement: 
Name: 
Frederick Starr
Title: 
Director
Body: 
The Central Asia-Caucasus Institute at the School of Advanced International Studies, Johns Hopkins University
Statement: 

This hearing focused on the human rights and democratization process in Uzbekistan. Despite Uzbekistan’s signing of major agreements promising multi-party elections and other democratic reforms, Uzbekistan has not implemented policy that would move it in this direction.  The hearing looked into what measures the U.S. could take within the OSCE to speed the democratization process in Uzbekistan.

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