Title

Situations of Kurds in Iran, Iraq, and Turkey

Monday, May 17, 1993
2226 Rayburn House Office Building
Washington, DC 20515
United States
Members: 
Name: 
Mary Sue Hafner
Title Text: 
Deputy Staff Director
Body: 
Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe
Witnesses: 
Name: 
Ahmet Turk
Title: 
Chairman
Body: 
People’s Labor Party
Name: 
Barham Salih
Title: 
Representative
Body: 
Iraqi Kurds

This briefing focused on the Kurdish minority, the fourth largest nationality in the Middle East primarily concentrated in the States of Iran, Iraq, and Turkey, a CSCE signatory state. The lack of institutional protection of human rights and individual freedoms that the Kurdish minority suffers from in each of these states was addressed. Additionally, the principles of territorial integrity, self-determination, and respect of human rights were explored in the context of the Middle East.

Witnesses at the briefing – including Ahmet Turk, Chairman of the People’s Labor Party and Barham Salih, a Representative of the Iraqi Kurds – offered descriptions of the historical context and the political framework in which the issue of violations of the human rights of the Kurdish minority has arisen. Mr. Salih presented his personal experience as the evidence of the process of forced assimilation that Kurds were enduring in Turkey at the time.

Relevant countries: 
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