Title

Northern Ireland: Why Justice in Individual Cases Matters

Wednesday, March 16, 2011
United States
Members: 
Name: 
Hon. Christopher Smith
Title Text: 
Chairman
Body: 
Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe
Name: 
Hon. Benjamin Cardin
Title Text: 
Co-Chairman
Body: 
Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe
Name: 
Hon. Donald Payne
Title Text: 
Commissioner
Body: 
Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe
Witnesses: 
Name: 
John Finucane
Title: 
Son of Patrick Finucane, human rights lawyer murdered by loyalist paramilitaries
Name: 
John Teggart
Title: 
Son of Daniel Teggart, victim of the 1971 Ballymurphy massacre
Name: 
Ciarán McAirt
Title: 
Grandson of John and Kitty Irvine, McGurk’s Bar bombing victim
Name: 
Jane Winter
Title: 
Director
Body: 
British Irish Rights Watch

This hearing, chaired by Christopher H. Smith (NJ-04), focused on possible British Government collusion or complicity in murders in Ireland during the Troubles. Witnesses at this hearing included John Finucane, John Teggart, Raymond McCord, Sr., and Ciarán McAirt, all relatives of Irish citizens murdered by British loyalists. Another witness was Jane Winter, Director of British Irish Rights Watch.

Chairman Smith expressed concern about the British government’s commitment to holding those who committed the murders accountable, particularly in light of the Inquiries Act of 2005, which empowered the government to limit independent action by the judiciary and block scrutiny of state actions in inquiries held under its terms. 

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