Title

The Museum of the History of Polish Jews

Thursday, March 13, 2008
3:00pm
B-318 Rayburn House Office Building
Washington, DC
United States
Members: 
Name: 
Hon. Alcee Hastings
Title Text: 
Chairman
Body: 
Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe
Statement: 
Name: 
Hon. Christopher Smith
Title Text: 
Ranking Member
Body: 
Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe
Statement: 
Witnesses: 
Name: 
Ewa Junczyk-Ziomecka
Title: 
Undersecretary of State
Body: 
Chancellery of the President of the Republic of Poland
Statement: 
Name: 
Ewa Wierzynska
Title: 
Deputy Director
Body: 
Museum of the History of Polish Jews, Warsaw
Name: 
Sigmund Rolat
Title: 
Chairman of the Board of Directors
Body: 
North American Council, Museum of the History of Polish Jews

Witnesses in this hearing spoke about their vision for the Museum of the History of Polish Jews, its mission, and what it means for Poland – a country that was once home to one of the largest Jewish communities in the world. The witnesses also highlighted the major significance the museum has for Poland and its post-war identity.

Relevant countries: 
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