Title

Kosovo’s Displaced and Imprisoned (Pts. 1 – 3)

Monday, February 28, 2000
United States
Members: 
Name: 
Hon. Christopher Smith
Title Text: 
Chairman
Body: 
Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe
Name: 
Hon. Ben Nighthorse Campbell
Title Text: 
Co-Chairman
Body: 
Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe
Name: 
Hon. Steny Hoyer
Title Text: 
Commissioner
Body: 
Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe
Witnesses: 
Name: 
Bill Frelick
Title: 
Director of Policy
Body: 
U.S. Committee for Refugees
Name: 
Susan Blaustein
Title: 
Senior Consultant
Body: 
International Crisis Group
Name: 
Andrezji Mirga
Title: 
Chairman
Body: 
Ethnic Relations Romani Advisory Council
Name: 
Ylber Bajraktari
Title: 
Student
Body: 
Kosovo
Name: 
Bishop Artemje
Title: 
Serbian Orthodox Bishop
Body: 
Prizen and Ruska

This hearing focused on former residents of Kosovo who were forced to leave their homes because of the conflict. Slobodan Milosevic was identified as a key figure in the displacement and the commissioners and witnesses discussed the possibility of the end of his regime.

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