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Energy and Environment

The OSCE recognizes that sustainable management of energy resources is one of the key challenges of the day, not only in the OSCE region, but across the globe.

In Kyiv (2013), the participating States acknowledged the link between energy-related activities and the environment, and encouraged participating States to make best use of the OSCE as a platform for a broad dialogue on good governance and transparency in the energy sector renewable energy and energy efficiency, new technologies, technology transfer and green growth. The OSCE has also focused its work on security issues related to energy, including protection of energy networks from natural and man-made disasters.

Energy security is a key topic for the OSCE as is the climate debate. In particular, participating States have discussed modalities and norms to generate a free, fair, and diversified energy market. On climate, participating States have shared best practices on curbing emissions. Corruption looms large in both topics as energy markets are influenced and collective action against climate change is undermined by corrupt actors.

Staff Contact: Paul Massaro, policy advisor

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