Title

Political and Civil Rights Leaders to Discuss Impact of George Floyd’s Death at Helsinki Commission Briefing

Tuesday, June 09, 2020

WASHINGTON—The Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe, also known as the Helsinki Commission, today announced the following staff-led online briefing:

8:46 (GEORGE FLOYD)
A Time for Transformation at Home and Abroad

Friday, June 12, 2020
10:00 a.m.

Register to attend.

George Floyd’s tragic death at the hands of a Minneapolis police officer—recorded for a wrenching eight minutes and 46 seconds—shocked the world.  During this online briefing, political and civil rights leaders from the United States and Europe will discuss the impact made by resulting protests and the need to change policing tactics, alongside an honest review of how racism stemming from the transatlantic slave trade and colonialism persists today.

Panelists scheduled to participate include:

  • Abena Oppong-Asare, Member of Parliament, United Kingdom
  • Adam Hollier, Michigan State Senator
  • Mitchell Esajas, Chair, New Urban Collective (Netherlands)
  • Karen Taylor, Chair, European Network Against Racism (ENAR)

Panelists may be added.

Media contact: 
Name: 
Stacy Hope
Email: 
csce[dot]press[at]mail[dot]house[dot]gov
Phone: 
202.225.1901
Relevant countries: 
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