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Cardin Statement on the Third Anniversary of the Attack on Pittsburgh’s Tree of Life Synagogue

Wednesday, October 27, 2021

WASHINGTON—Helsinki Commission Chairman Sen. Ben Cardin (MD), who also serves as Special Representative on Anti-Semitism, Racism and Intolerance for the OSCE Parliamentary Assembly, released the following statement on the third anniversary of the deadly shooting at the Tree of Life Congregation in Pittsburgh.

“It’s been three years since a gunman on a hate-filled mission killed 11 worshippers at the Tree of Life Congregation. On that awful day, we lost the lives of Joyce Fienberg, Richard Gottfried, Rose Mallinger, Jerry Rabinowitz, Cecil and David Rosenthal, Bernice and Sylvan Simon, Daniel Stein, Melvin Wax and Irving Younger. Each are still in our hearts. The shooter also injured six others, including four Pittsburgh police officers.

“It’s unthinkable that anyone would walk in to sacred place of worship armed with an assault rifle and multiple handguns, yelling ‘All Jews must die.’ Horrified doesn’t capture the feeling I had when I first heard of the event.

“According to a recent report, 1 in 4 American Jews has experienced anti-Semitism over the past year and 4 in 10 American Jews feel the need to conceal their Jewishness in public for fear of anti-Semitism. In 2021, we saw a spike of anti-Semitic violence and language across the country.

“Every person has a responsibility to break the cycle of anti-Semitism, racism and bigotry that has been taught from one generation to the next, in this country and around the world. Leaders, especially, need to be accountable for ending hate through their words and their deeds. This violent attack in Pittsburgh should never have happened. Hate should have no place in our society.

“Through the darkness, as Pittsburgh mourned its dead, the community responded with messages of compassion, tolerance and respect. Through their pain, they reminded all of us that the antidote to hate is not revenge or more hate, but love. May the memory of those killed at the Tree of Life synagogue be a blessing to their community and may their families, the survivors, and our society as a whole find peace.”

Media contact: 
Name: 
Stacy Hope
Email: 
csce[dot]press[at]mail[dot]house[dot]gov
Phone: 
202.225.1901
Relevant issues: 
Leadership: 
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