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Arctic Development to Be Discussed at Helsinki Commission Briefing

Thursday, September 28, 2017

WASHINGTON—The Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe, also known as the Helsinki Commission, in conjunction with the Senate Arctic Caucus, Senate Oceans Caucus, and Congressional Arctic Working Group, today announced the following briefing:

A NEW OCEAN IN THE NORTH: PERILS AND POSSIBILITIES

Thursday, October 5, 2017
3:30 PM – 5:00 PM
Dirksen Senate Office Building
Room G11

Live Webcast: www.facebook.com/HelsinkiCommission

Increasingly navigable waters and technological advances have opened the Arctic to further exploration, and an abundance of natural resources is driving investment in the region. Given the Arctic’s economic potential and environmental implications, the “High North” is likely to become a new theater of international engagement.

As one of eight Arctic nations, the United States holds a vested interest in encouraging economic development in the region. However, U.S. Arctic infrastructure is underdeveloped and is dwarfed by Russia’s investment in the region. Moreover, like other Arctic nations, the United States must contend with the challenge posed by melting ice caps and rising sea levels.

The briefing will examine the importance of the development of Arctic infrastructure as the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe’s (OSCE) least-developed region becomes more accessible. It will also analyze the challenges faced by the international community to promote greater cooperation in unlocking the region’s potential.

The following panelists are scheduled to speak:

  • Julie Gourley, Senior Arctic Official, U.S. Department of State
  • Iina Peltonen, Embassy of Finland in the United States
  • Rear Admiral Michael F. McAllister, Commander, 17th Coast Guard District, U.S. Coast Guard
  • Melanie Bahnke, President and CEO, Kawerak, Inc.
  • Mark Smith, CEO, Vitus Energy
Media contact: 
Name: 
Stacy Hope
Email: 
csce[dot]press[at]mail[dot]house[dot]gov
Phone: 
202.225.1901
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