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Torture

The obligation to refrain from torture is a non-derogable human right – it may not be suspended at any time, even during wars or states of emergency. It is also one of the few rights to which there are no exceptions. The Helsinki Commission has addressed issues related to the use of medical personnel in cases of torture or ill treatment, the ability of civil society to monitor and report on torture or ill treatment, torture as an instrument of political oppression, and rehabilitative support for the victims of torture.

Staff Contact: Erika Schlager, counsel on international law

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