Title

Russian Disinformation Focus of Upcoming Helsinki Commission Hearing

Thursday, September 07, 2017

WASHINGTON—The Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe, also known as the Helsinki Commission, today announced the following hearing:

THE SCOURGE OF RUSSIAN DISINFORMATION

Thursday, September 14, 2017
9:30 AM
Dirksen Senate Office Building
Room 562

Live Webcast: http://www.senate.gov/isvp/?type=live&comm=csce&filename=csce091417

Russian disinformation is a grave transnational threat, facilitating unacceptable aggression by Russia both at home and across the 57-nation OSCE region.  Russian disinformation helps support rampant violations of OSCE norms by the Putin regime, ranging from internal human rights abuses to military intervention in neighboring states to interference in elections in several countries.

The hearing will examine Russia’s efforts to spread disinformation, both domestically and abroad, as well as U.S. efforts to set the record straight with Russians, Ukrainians, and other speakers of Russian in the region.  Witnesses will also discuss the effectiveness of U.S. counter-measures across a variety of platforms; whether resources available correspond to the threat; and whether coordination amongst key players within the U.S. Government at the Department of State, Department of Defense, and USAID, and with European partners is adequate.  Finally, with German elections scheduled for September 24, one of the witnesses will highlight attempts by Russia to use NGOs and think tanks in Germany to try to influence the outcome.

The following witnesses are scheduled to testify:

  • John F. Lansing, Chief Executive Officer and Director, Broadcasting Board of Governors (BBG)
  • Melissa Hooper, Director of Human Rights and Civil Society Programs, Human Rights First
  • Molly McKew, CEO, Fianna Strategies
Media contact: 
Name: 
Stacy Hope
Email: 
csce[dot]press[at]mail[dot]house[dot]gov
Phone: 
202.225.1901
Relevant issues: 
Relevant countries: 
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