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Corruption Currents
The Wall Street Journal
Samuel Rubenfeld
Monday, October 23, 2017

A daily roundup of corruption news from across the Web. We also provide a daily roundup of important risk & compliance stories via our daily newsletter, The Morning Risk Report, which readers can sign up for here. Follow us on Twitter at @WSJRisk.

Bribery:

A bribery case in Russia involving the country’s elite is causing a stir in the Kremlin. (NY Times)

The question of what constitutes bribery is trickier than it seems. (Washington Post, GAB)

The NCAA bribery scandal claimed more scalps. (AP, ESPN, 24)

Cybercrime:

The Dark Web’s most notorious thief was doxed. (Daily Beast)

The hack of Equifax is leading to calls to change the credit-reporting industry. (NPR)

Fraud:

A federal judge postponed a Texas lawmaker’s fraud trial. (mySA)

Money Laundering:

Canadian authorities laid charges against a money-transfer firm in a case of alleged drug-linked money laundering. The firm didn’t respond to a request for comment. (Vancouver Sun)

A guilty plea to a structuring charge, in which he made transactions of a certain size to avoid regulators, killed a man’s business and his wife, and the IRS won’t return his money. (Washington Post)

The son of Thailand’s former premier blasted authorities for releasing photos of him answering questions about money-laundering allegations. (Bangkok Post, Reuters, Bangkok Post)

Indian authorities continue bringing money-laundering cases. (Express, Telegraph)

Sanctions:

The U.S. State Department revoked the visa of Bill Browder after Russia sought an Interpol notice for his arrest in the death of Sergei Magnitsky. Mr. Magnitsky, however, died in Russian police custody after reporting a tax fraud while working for Mr. Browder; his death led the U.S. to pass the Magnitsky Act. (Newsweek, NPR, euronews, NY Times, Channel4)

Iran’s president is cutting back on the Revolutionary Guard Corps’ power amid sanctions. Did President Donald Trump preserve the status quo on the Iran deal? (NY Times, Platts)

Turkey’s banking regulator dismissed reports that the country’s financial institutions face fines for violating U.S. sanctions on Iran. (Reuters)

Switzerland implemented a series of sanctions on North Korea. (Swissinfo)

Terrorism Finance:

Can bankers fight terrorism? (Foreign Affairs)

Transparency:

Panama Papers: Malta offered a $1.18 million reward for information on the person who killed a reporter investigating the leak. The EU ended its inquiry into the leak. (AP, WNYC, EuroNews)

Whistleblowers:

A U.K. judge sued to be included as a class of whistleblowers. (Guardian)

General Anti-Corruption:

The U.S. is seeking to seize assets it said were looted from disaster relief in the Philippines and placed in California. (OCWeekly)

China’s anti-graft czar is about to leave the agency as Beijing puts new laws in place. The country banned its notorious interrogation technique as part of the reforms. (SCMP, SCMP, Reuters)

Officials: Slovakia jailed government ministers for corruption for the first time. A fugitive former Mexican state official allegedly stole cows bought with government funds. (Bloomberg, BBC)

A South African corruption investigation continues. U.K. banks were exposed, regulators say. (Guardian, Fin24, TimesLive, BBC)

The Helsinki Commission fights kleptocracy. (KI)

U.S. investigations into Russian meddling in the U.S. election continue, as Mr. Trump pledged to pay staffers’ legal bills. (NBC, NY Times, Washington Post)

Taekwondo generated the most corruption complaints in Korean sports. (Korea Herald)

 

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