Title

THE TRAJECTORY OF DEMOCRACY – WHY HUNGARY MATTERS

Tuesday, March 19, 2013
Capitol Visitor Center, Room SVC 210
Washington D.C., DC 20515
United States
Members: 
Name: 
Hon. Benjamin Cardin
Title Text: 
Chairman
Body: 
Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe
Name: 
Hon. Chris Smith
Title Text: 
Co-Chairman
Body: 
Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe
Witnesses: 
Name: 
Brent Hartley
Title: 
Deputy Assistant Secretary For European and Eurasian Affairs
Body: 
U.S. Department of State
Name: 
Hon. Jozsef Szajer
Title: 
Hungarian Member of the European Parliament
Body: 
Fidesz-Hungarian Civic Union
Name: 
Dr. Kim Lane Scheppele
Title: 
Director
Body: 
Program in Law and Public Affairs, Princeton University
Name: 
Sylvana Habdank-Kolaczkowska
Title: 
Director for Nations in Transit
Body: 
Freedom House
Name: 
Paul Shapiro
Title: 
Director
Body: 
Center for Advanced Holocaust Studies, U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum

This hearing focused on recent constitutional changes to the Hungarian Constitution which has brought concerns from the United States and the European Union. Recently, Hungary has instituted sweeping and controversial changes to its constitutional framework, effectively remaking the country’s entire legal foundation. In addition to constitutional changes, there have been some bills passed without the proper democratic spirit and has brought concerns about the trajectory of democracy in that country. The witnesses raised the changes that have created the majority government into a nearly one-party rule structure and compared such actions to President Madison’s written exposé in the Federalist Papers number 47.

Relevant countries: 
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