Title

Trade and Investment in Central Europe and the NIS

Monday, July 10, 1995
2200 Rayburn House Office Building
Washington D.C., DC 20024
United States
Members: 
Name: 
Marlene Kaufmann
Title Text: 
Counsel for International Trade
Body: 
Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe
Name: 
Charles Meissner
Title Text: 
Executive Branch Commissioner
Body: 
Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe
Witnesses: 
Name: 
Harriet Craig Peterson
Title: 
President
Body: 
Cornerstone International Group
Name: 
Thomas Price
Title: 
Coordinator for OSCE Affairs
Body: 
State Department

This briefing was the tenth in a series of briefings covering topics such as U.S. assistance to Central and East Europe and the NIS, and free trade unions. Topics of discussion included the economic aspects of efforts to develop institutional networks between the Central and Eastern European countries and the OSCE and the Western European multilateral structures and the progress that has been made by countries in developing association agreements with the European Union.

Witnesses testifying at this briefing – including Harriet Craig Peterson, President of Cornerstone International Group and Thomas Price, Coordinator for OSCE Affairs for the State Department – evaluated regional issues associated with infrastructure, environment, energy, and border procedures that needed to be addressed to produce a smoother flow of goods from an economic perspective.

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