Title

Religious Freedom, Anti-Semitism, and Rule of Law in Europe and Eurasia

Thursday, February 11, 2016
1:00pm
House Visitor Center
Room 210
Washington, FL
United States
Members: 
Name: 
Hon. Christopher Smith
Title Text: 
Chairman
Body: 
Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe
Name: 
Hon. Benjamin Cardin
Title Text: 
Commissioner
Body: 
Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe
Name: 
Hon. Joseph Pitts
Title Text: 
Commissioner
Body: 
Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe
Name: 
Hon. David Schweikert
Title Text: 
Member
Body: 
U.S. House of Representatives
Witnesses: 
Name: 
Michael Georg Link
Title: 
Director
Body: 
Office for Democratic Institutions and Human Rights
Statement: 

In this hearing ODIHR Director Michael Link discussed the importance of the OSCE's work on human rights through ODIHR.  He focused on the fight against anti-Semitism and the human rights situation in Ukraine.  He spoke about ODIHR's newest project to combat anti-Semitism, called "Turning Words into Action," which will give leaders the knowledge and tools to address anti-Semitism in their communities.   Director Link also noted that in Ukraine he was particularly concerned about the human rights violations in Crimea and expressed his support for a cease-fire as a pre-condition of the implementation of the Minsk package.

Relevant countries: 
Leadership: 
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