Title

Prerequisites for Progress in Northern Ireland

Wednesday, March 21, 2012
United States
Members: 
Name: 
Hon. Christopher Smith
Title Text: 
Chairman
Body: 
Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe
Name: 
Hon Michael Burgess, M.D.
Title Text: 
Commissioner
Body: 
Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe
Name: 
Hon. Eliot Engel
Title Text: 
Member of Congress
Body: 
The United States House of Representatives
Witnesses: 
Name: 
Geraldine Finucane
Title: 
Widow of Murdered Human Rights Lawyer Patrick Finucane
Name: 
Christopher Stanley
Title: 
Lawyer
Body: 
British-Irish Rights Watch
Name: 
Mark Thompson
Title: 
Director
Body: 
Relatives of Justice
Name: 
Patricia Lundy
Title: 
Senior Lecturer
Body: 
University of Ulster
Name: 
Brian Gormally
Title: 
Director
Body: 
Committee on the Administration of Justice

This hearing assessed the progress towards peace made in Northern Ireland and discussed ways to ensure the sustainability of the peace.  Witnesses condemned the British government for backtracking on the Good Friday Agreement, as well as the United States for not putting enough pressure on Great Britain. Witnesses identified the murder of human rights lawyer Patrick Finucane, whose widow Geraldine was in attendance, as an obstacle to peace.

Relevant countries: 
Leadership: 
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