Title

Justice In The International Extradition System, The Case Of George Wright And Beyond

Wednesday, July 11, 2012
United States
Members: 
Name: 
Hon. Christopher Smith
Title Text: 
Chairman
Body: 
Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe
Name: 
Hon. Benjamin Cardin
Title Text: 
Co-Chairman
Body: 
Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe
Witnesses: 
Name: 
R.J. Gallagher
Title: 
Retired Special Agent
Body: 
FBI
Name: 
Jonathan Winer
Title: 
Senior Director, APCO Worldwide
Body: 
Former U.S. Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for International Law Enforcement
Name: 
Ann Patterson
Title: 
Daughter
Body: 
Walter Patterson

This briefing discussed the case of George Wright.  In 1963, Wright was implicated in the robbery of a gas station, during which he fatally beat and shot a man named Walter Patterson (a veteran of World War II and a Bronze Star recipient). Wright was sentenced to prison, but escaped to Algeria in the middle of his stay at Leesburg State Prison.

41 years later, Wright was discovered in Portugal. In spite of the U.S.’s and Portugal’s firm commitment regarding extradition, a court in Portugal inexplicably refused to extradite Wright. This hearing’s goal was to scrutinize what transpired in this case and what could be achieved in order to bring Wright to justice, raising the broader question about the international extradition system.

Relevant issues: 
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