Title

The International Tribunal and Beyond: Pursuing Justice for Atrocities in the Western Balkans

Tuesday, December 12, 2017
10:00am
Rayburn House Office Building, Room 2255
Washington, DC
United States
Joint Briefing with the Tom Lantos Human Rights Commission
Official Transcript: 
Members: 
Name: 
Representative Randy Hultgren
Title Text: 
Commissioner
Body: 
Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe
Name: 
Representative Eliot Engel
Title Text: 
House of Representatives
Body: 
Member of Tom Lantos Commission and House Foreign Affairs Committee
Moderator(s): 
Name: 
Robert Hand
Title Text: 
Policy Advisor
Body: 
Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe
Witnesses: 
Name: 
Serge Brammertz
Title: 
Chief Prosecutor
Body: 
International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia
Name: 
Nemanja Stjepanovic
Title: 
Member of the Executive Board
Body: 
Humanitarian Law Center
Name: 
Diane Orentlicher
Title: 
Professor of Law
Body: 
Washington College of Law, American University

Between 1991 and 2001 the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia, made up of six republics, was broken apart by a series of brutal armed conflicts. The conflicts were characterized by widespread and flagrant violations of international humanitarian law, among them mass killings of civilians, the massive, organized and systematic detention and rape of women, torture, and practices of ethnic cleansing, including forced displacement.

In 1992 the U.N. established a Commission of Experts that documented the horrific crimes on the ground and led to the 1993 creation of the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY). This month, after more than two decades of persistent, ground-breaking efforts to prosecute the individuals responsible for war crimes, crimes against humanity, and genocide in the former Yugoslavia, the ICTY is concluding its work. As it prepares to close its doors, this briefing will assess the tribunal’s achievements and limitations, and most importantly, what still needs to be done by the countries of the region to seek justice in outstanding cases, bring greater closure to victims, and foster greater reconciliation among peoples.

Panelists discussed these questions and suggested ways that the United States, Europe, and the international community as a whole can encourage the further pursuit of justice in the Western Balkans.

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