Title

Human Rights in Turkey

Tuesday, June 06, 1995
2200 Rayburn House Office Building
Washington, DC, DC 20024
United States
Official Transcript: 
Members: 
Name: 
Amb. Sam Wise
Title Text: 
Director for International Policy
Body: 
Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe
Witnesses: 
Name: 
Akin Birdal
Title: 
Chairman
Body: 
Human Rights Association of Turkey
Name: 
Yavuz Onen
Title: 
President
Body: 
Human Rights Foundation of Turkey

Sam Wise, director for international policy at the Commission, led a discussion on the human rights situation in Turkey in 1995, specifically regarding Turkey’s Kurdish minority and the human rights implications of terrorism.  Wise highlighted the human costs of both terrorism itself and efforts to combat it, which has mainly affected civilians. Panelists Akin Birdal and Yavuz Onen spoke of the assassinations and disappearances of prominent human rights activists, journalists and others that unfortunately became routine by 1995. Those who publicize human rights violations in Turkey faced official harassment or jail for their efforts.

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