Title

HEARING: THE STATE OF DEMOCRACY AND HUMAN RIGHTS IN TURKMENISTAN

Tuesday, March 21, 2000
2:00pm
234 Cannon House Office Building
Washington, DC 20515
United States
Members: 
Name: 
Hon. Chris Smith
Title Text: 
Chairman
Body: 
Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe
Statement: 
Name: 
Hon. Ben Nighthorse Campbell
Title Text: 
Co-Chairman
Body: 
Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe
Statement: 
Name: 
Hon. Steny Hoyer
Title Text: 
Ranking Member
Body: 
Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe
Statement: 
Name: 
Hon. Joseph Pitts
Title Text: 
Commissioner
Body: 
Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe
Statement: 
Name: 
Hon. Sam Brownback
Title Text: 
Commissioner
Body: 
Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe
Statement: 
Witnesses: 
Name: 
John Beyrle
Title: 
Principal Deputy to Ambassador-at-Large
Body: 
Special Adviser to the Secretary of State for New Independent States
Statement: 
Name: 
Avdy Kuliev
Title: 
Member
Body: 
Turkmen Opposition in Exile
Statement: 
Name: 
Pyotr Iwaszkiewicz
Title: 
Former Member
Body: 
OSCE Office in Ashgabat
Name: 
Firuz Kazemzadeh
Title: 
Member
Body: 
U.S. Commission on International Religious Freedom
Statement: 
Name: 
Cassandra Cavanaugh
Title: 
Research Associate
Body: 
Human Rights Watch/Helsinki
Statement: 
Name: 
E. Wayne Merry
Title: 
Director, Program on European Societies in Transition
Body: 
Atlantic Council of the United
Statement: 

This hearing reviewed the democratization process, human rights, and religious liberty in Turkmenistan. This was one in a series that the Helsinki Commission has held on Central Asia.

Turkmenistan has become a worse-case scenario of post-Soviet development. Human Rights Watch Helsinki did not yield from calling Turkmenistan one of the most repressive countries in the world. As a post-Soviet bloc country, Turkmenistan remains a one-party state, but even that party is only a mere shadow of the former ruling Communist Party. All the real power resides in the country’s dictator, who savagely crushes any opposition or criticism. The witnesses gave testimony surrounding the legal obstacles in the constitution of Turkmenistan and other obstacles that the authoritarian voices in the government use to suppress opposition.

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