Title

Examining the Prospects for Democratic Change in Belarus

Tuesday, December 04, 2007
1539 Longworth House Office Building
Washington, DC 20515
United States
Official Transcript: 
Members: 
Name: 
Hon. Alcee Hastings
Title Text: 
Chairman
Body: 
Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe
Witnesses: 
Name: 
Mr. Aleksandr Milinkevich
Title: 
Leader
Body: 
Movement for Freedom
Name: 
Mr. Anatoly Lebedka
Title: 
Chair
Body: 
United Civic Party of Belarus
Name: 
Ms. Enira Bronitskaya
Title: 
Human Rights Activist

The briefing focused on the prospects for change in Belarus, a country that is widely considered to have Europe’s worst record with respect to human rights and democracy.  The presence of the OSCE at the March 2006 Presidential elections was briefly mentioned, as were the fundamental flaws observed during these elections.

The witnesses testifying at this briefing evaluated the obstacles that pro-democratic activists face in Belarus. Violent and repressive tactics of the authorities were cited as major issues for good governance in the country. Several suggestions for improving the democratic quality of the government were proposed, including increasing activity through diplomatic channels.

Relevant countries: 
Leadership: 
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