Title

Europeans of African Descent ‘Black Europeans’: Race, Rights and Politics

Tuesday, November 19, 2013
SDG–50 Dirksen Senate Office Building
Washington, DC 20515
United States
Official Transcript: 
Members: 
Name: 
Hon. Alcee Hastings
Title Text: 
Ranking Member
Body: 
Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe
Name: 
Hon. Ben Cardin
Title Text: 
Chairman
Body: 
Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe
Witnesses: 
Name: 
Larry Olomoofe
Title: 
Racism and Xenophobia Advisor
Body: 
OSCE/ODIHR Tolerance Unit
Name: 
Salome Mbugua
Title: 
CEO AkiDwA
Body: 
Migrant Women's Network, Ireland
Name: 
Hedwig Bvumburah
Title: 
Director
Body: 
Cross-Culture International Foundation - Malta
Name: 
Charles Asante-Yeboa
Title: 
President
Body: 
Africa Center, Ukraine
Name: 
Jallow Momodou
Title: 
Vice Chair, European Network Against Racism
Body: 
Chair, Pan-African Movement for Justice

Racist acts targeting Black cabinet-level officials in Italy and France have put a spotlight on the experiences of the 7-10 million people of African Descent in Europe / Black Europeans. A visible minority in Europe often unacknowledged despite a centuries’ long presence in Europe, Black Europeans have increasingly become the targets of discrimination, pernicious racial profiling, and violent hate crimes impacting equal access to housing, employment, education, and justice.

Europe today grapples with the complex intersection of national identity, decreasing birth rates, increasing immigration, security concerns, and a rise in extremist political parties and vigilantism. In this context, the experiences of Black Europeans increasingly serve as a measure of the strength of European democracies and commitments to human rights. The briefing discussed the work of Black European rights organizations and the efforts of the international community to address issues of inequality, discrimination, and inclusion for Black Europeans, in addition to discussing similarities and work with African-American civil rights organizations.

Relevant issues: 
Relevant countries: 
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