Title

Escalating Violence against Coptic Women and Girls: Will the New Egypt be more Dangerous than the Old?

Wednesday, July 18, 2012
210 Cannon House Office Building
Washington, DC 20515
United States
Official Transcript: 
Members: 
Name: 
Hon. Chris Smith
Title Text: 
Chairman
Body: 
Commission on Security & Cooperation in Europe
Statement: 
Name: 
Hon. Robert Aderholt
Title Text: 
Commissioner
Body: 
Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe
Witnesses: 
Name: 
Dr. Walid Phares
Title: 
Co-Secretary General
Body: 
Transatlantic Legislative Group on Counterterrorism
Name: 
Dr. Katrina Lantos-Swett
Title: 
Chair
Body: 
U.S. Commission on International Religious Freedom
Name: 
Michele Clark
Title: 
Adjunct Professor, the Elliott School of International Affairs
Body: 
George Washington University

This hearing examined evidence that, as Egypt’s political and social crisis persists, violence against Coptic women and girls is escalating, including kidnappings, forced conversions, and other human rights abuses.  According to a new report released at the hearing by Michele Clark, at least 550 Coptic women and girls over the last five years have been kidnapped from their communities.  The few who have been found suffered human rights abuses including forced conversion, rape, forced marriage, beatings, and domestic servitude while being held by their captors, raising the question whether developments in the new Egypt are leaving Coptic women and their families more vulnerable than ever. 

The hearing also included testimony and suggestions about possible initiatives the United States can take that may drastically curb the human rights issues in Egypt as they pertain to Coptic rights.

Relevant countries: 
Leadership: 
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