Title

Civil Society, Democracy, and Markets in East Central Europe and the NIS: Problems and Perspectives

Thursday, February 18, 1999
10:00am
2172 Rayburn House Office Building
Washington, DC 20515
United States
Moderator(s): 
Name: 
Dorothy Douglas Taft
Title Text: 
Chief of Staff
Body: 
The Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe
Name: 
E. Wayne Merry
Title Text: 
Former Senior Advisor
Body: 
The Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe
Witnesses: 
Name: 
Adrian Karatnycky
Title: 
President
Body: 
Freedom House
Name: 
Alexander Motyl
Title: 
Deputy Director of the Center for Global Changes and Governance
Body: 
Rutgers University

This briefing, led by Chief of Staff Dorothy Douglas Taft, was prompted by the book Nations in Transit 1998, a study and analysis of 25 post-Communist countries which supported the monitoring of the region’s adherence to the Helsinki Accords. Questions included in the report were organized in the categories of political processes, civil society, independent media, the rule of law, governance and pubic administration, macro-economic policy, micro-economic policy, and privatization.

The witnesses - Adrian Karatnycky, Professor Alexander Motyl, and E. Wayne Merry - discussed the document and interpreted some of the political and economic trends in the region. They expanded upon some of the insights provided in the book and analyzed the region’s progress, reflecting on their own experiences working with the Soviet Union.

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