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PROCEEDINGS AND DEBATES OF THE 106th CONGRESS, 1st SESSION

Vol. 145 Washington, Tuesday, November 16, 1999 No. 165

House of Representatives


EXPRESSING UNITED STATES POLICY TOWARD THE SLOVAK REPUBLIC



HON. CHRISTOPHER H. SMITH

OF NEW JERSEY

Tuesday, November 16, 1999


Mr. SMITH of New Jersey. Mr. Speaker, as chairman of the Helsinki Commission, I watched for several years as the human rights situation in Slovakia deteriorated under the leadership of former Prime Minister Vladimir Meciar. I saw how the fledgling democratic institutions of that new country were undermined, how parliamentary and constitutional processes were threatened, and how the rule of law was slowly but surely choked. I, joined by colleagues from the Commission, raised these issues time and again with Slovak officials, as did other officials of the U.S. Government. Unfortunately, Mr. Meciar was not very receptive to our arguments.

As it happened, however, the fate of the democratic process in Slovakia was not left to the tender mercies of Vladimir Meciar. A year ago, the people of Slovakia took matters into their own hands. In an election carefully monitored by the OSCE, voters returned to office a coalition government that ended Meciar's increasingly authoritarian rule.

Initially, this broadly based--some might even say weak--coalition seemed to stand only for one thing: it was against Meciar. But in the year that has passed, we can not say that this government is not simply united in its opposition against the former regime, it is united in its commitment for democracy, for the rule of law, for a free market economy, for a transparent privatization process that is accountable to the people, and for a community of democracies dedicated to the protection of their common security.

Mr. Speaker, the process of transition that Slovakia struggles with today is not an easy one. In fact, many of the commemorations held this month to celebrate the fall of the Berlin Wall and the end of communism have focused on just how difficult this transition has been, including for Slovakia's closest neighbors. In spite of this, the Slovak Government has proceeded to make some very tough decisions this year. I am particularly impressed by the willingness of Prime Minister Dzurinda to make decisions that, while necessary for the long term, economic well-being of his country, may be very politically unpopular in the short term. That takes courage.

I know, of course, that Slovakia still has a lot of work ahead. As in most other European countries, there is much that should be done in Slovakia to improve respect for the human rights of the Romani minority. But there is much that Slovakia has accomplished in the past year and--especially as someone who has been critical of Slovakia in the past--I want to acknowledge and commend those achievements. Mr. Speaker, I hope others will join me in sending this message and will support H. Con. Res. 165.





Countries

Slovak Republic

Issues

Roma
Rule of Law/Independence of Judiciary


   
 

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From left, Rep. Smith, Assistant Secretary of State Michael Posner, Chairman Cardin, and Ranking Member Hastings hear testimony on threats to media freedom at a hearing June 9, 2010